Edmond

Becquerel

Symposium

Simultaneous traduction French to English available

Edmond Becquerel : A passion for Light

March 24th, 2020 → Postponed to later date due to corona virus alert (registrations still open)

Celebration of the 200th anniversary of the birth of Edmond Becquerel, Paris

From the discovery of the photovoltaic effect to color photography and luminescence

At the source of major applications of the 21st century

Presentation of the symposium and flyer

Download the Flyer here

The aim is to celebrate the impressive scientific contributions of Edmond Becquerel (1820-1891), with a particular focus on the discovery of the photovoltaic effect, color photography and phosphorescence. The international dimension, the interdisplinarity between chemistry and physics, and the nowadays outmost importance of his work will be underlined, in particular for photovoltaics in the context of the energy transition. This will be done in the form of alternating specialist and general public talks. The initiative is supported by key french scientific institutions and representatives and the European Becquerel prize committee for Photovoltaics.

Who was Edmond Becquerel?

Edmond Becquerel was born on March 24, 1820. He carried out his research and teachings at the Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle and the Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers in Paris and was a member the French Academy of Sciences from 1863 to his death in 1891. He was President of the Academy of Sciences in 1880.  He is at the origin of major advances in the study of the electrical effects of light on materials and electrochemical interfaces, highlighted by the discovery of the photovoltaic effect in 1939, when he was 19 years old. Then he invented the first color photography process and opened new avenues in the study of the phosphorescence. Many other aspects of his work were dealing with chemistry, electrochemistry, magnetism and natural sciences. His passion for light was a golden guide line of his scientific interest all along his life, with his testimonial book on light.  He remains largely unknown, in particular in France, unlike his father Antoine and especially his son Henri, discoverer of radioactivity, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903, together with Marie and Pierre Curie. The celebration of the bicentenary of his birthday is a unique opportunity to give credit to a great scientist, discoverer of a key energy of the 21st century.
Symposium Presentation

The aim is to celebrate the impressive scientific contributions of Edmond Becquerel (1820-1891), with a particular focus on the discovery of the photovoltaic effect, color photography and phosphorescence. The international dimension, the interdisplinarity between chemistry and physics, and the nowadays outmost importance of his work will be underlined, in particular for photovoltaics in the context of the energy transition. This will be done in the form of alternating specialist and general public talks. The initiative is supported by key french scientific institutions and representatives and the European Becquerel prize committee for Photovoltaics.

Who was Edmond Becquerel?

Edmond Becquerel was born on March 24, 1820. He carried out his research and teachings at the Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle and the Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers in Paris and was a member the French Academy of Sciences from 1863 to his death in 1891. He was President of the Academy of Sciences in 1880.  He is at the origin of major advances in the study of the electrical effects of light on materials and electrochemical interfaces, highlighted by the discovery of the photovoltaic effect in 1939, when he was 19 years old. Then he invented the first color photography process and opened new avenues in the study of the phosphorescence. Many other aspects of his work were dealing with chemistry, electrochemistry, magnetism and natural sciences. His passion for light was a golden guide line of his scientific interest all along his life, with his testimonial book on light.  He remains largely unknown, in particular in France, unlike his father Antoine and especially his son Henri, discoverer of radioactivity, who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903, together with Marie and Pierre Curie. The celebration of the bicentenary of his birthday is a unique opportunity to give credit to a great scientist, discoverer of a key energy of the 21st century.
Organizers

Daniel Lincot

CNRS, Institut Photovoltaïque d’Île de France (IPVF), 18 Boulevard Thomas Gobert, 91120 Palaiseau. Email : Daniel.lincot@cnrs.fr,
tel : 0674882094

Bertrand Lavédrine

Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation – CNRS, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Ministère de la Culture,  36 rue Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, F-75005 Paris. Email : bertrand.lavedrine@mnhn.fr

Organizers

Daniel Lincot

CNRS, Institut Photovoltaïque d’Île de France (IPVF), 18 Boulevard Thomas Gobert, 91120 Palaiseau. Email : Daniel.lincot@cnrs.fr,
tel : 0674882094

Bertrand Lavédrine

Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation – CNRS, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Ministère de la Culture,  36 rue Geoffroy Saint Hilaire, F-75005 Paris. Email : bertrand.lavedrine@mnhn.fr

Scientific Advisory Committee
  • Edmond Amouyal
  • Olivier Azzola
  • Loïc Barbo
  • Nicolas Barreau
  • Christine Blondel
  • Jean Eric Bourée
  • Gallus Cadonau
  • Michel Cassir
  • Jean-Pierre Chevalier
  • Gilberte Chambaud
  • Xavier Daval
  • Roch Drozdowski-Strehl
  • Angela Grassi
  • Jean François Guillemoles
  • Denis Guthleben
  • Peter Helm
  • Vincent Jacques Le Seigneur
  • André Joffre
  • Anis Jouini
  • Florence Lambert
  • Marie-Angélique Languille
  • Michèle Leduc
  • Thomas Leroux
  • Jean Louis Lazzari
  • Jean-Michel Lourtioz
  • Richard Loyen
  • Joachim Luther
  • Philippe Malbranche
  • Gaetan Masson
  • Wolfgang Palz
  • Paul Rigny
  • Didier Roux
  • Nathanaelle Schneider
  • Hans Schock
  • Victor de Seauve
  • Abdelilah Slaoui
  • Costel Subran
  • Daniel Suchet
  • Jean-Marie Tarascon
  • Bertrand Theys
Scientific Advisory Committee
  • Edmond Amouyal
  • Olivier Azzola
  • Loïc Barbo
  • Nicolas Barreau
  • Christine Blondel
  • Jean Eric Bourée
  • Gallus Cadonau
  • Michel Cassir
  • Jean-Pierre Chevalier
  • Gilberte Chambaud
  • Xavier Daval
  • Roch Drozdowski-Strehl
  • Angela Grassi
  • Jean François Guillemoles
  • Denis Guthleben
  • Peter Helm
  • Vincent Jacques Le Seigneur
  • André Joffre
  • Anis Jouini
  • Florence Lambert
  • Marie-Angélique Languille
  • Michèle Leduc
  • Thomas Leroux
  • Jean Louis Lazzari
  • Jean-Michel Lourtioz
  • Richard Loyen
  • Joachim Luther
  • Philippe Malbranche
  • Gaetan Masson
  • Wolfgang Palz
  • Paul Rigny
  • Didier Roux
  • Nathanaelle Schneider
  • Hans Schock
  • Victor de Seauve
  • Abdelilah Slaoui
  • Costel Subran
  • Daniel Suchet
  • Jean-Marie Tarascon
  • Bertrand Theys
Preliminary program
Edmond Becquerel : A passion for Light
Provisionnal Programme
Organizers : Daniel Lincot (CNRS-IPVF) and bertrand Lavedrine (MNHN)
9 am-9.30am Opening session

Under the presidency of Bruno David (President of the Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle) and Roch Drozdowski-Strehl (General Director of IPVF), Joachim Luther (Président du Comité Becquerel), Pascale Heurtel (CNAM), Patrice Simon (Académie des Sciences), Claire-Marie Pradier (CNRS), Edmond Amouyal (LSI,Ecole Polytechnique), Gilberte Chambaud (Univ. Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée, SCF), Costel Subran (F2S)

Session 1 – Chair: Denis Guthleben (CNRS)

9.30-10 am “A passion for extreme light”,
Gérard Mourou (Nobel Prize in Physics 2018, IZEST, Ecole polytechnique)

10-10.20 amPanorama of life and work of Edmond Becquerel
Daniel Lincot (CNRS-IPVF)

10.20-10.40 amThe Becquerel, a line of experimenters“,
Christine Blondel (historian)

10.40-11 am Break

Session 2- Chair: Wolfgang Palz (EU Official ret.)

11-11.20 amThe electrochemical actinometer and the discovery of the photovoltaic effect“,
Jérôme Fatet (University of Limoges)

11.20-11.40 amEdmond Becquerel and photography“,
Bertrand Lavédrine (MNHN), Victor de Seauve (CRC)

11.40-12 amColor photography by Edmond Becquerel and quantum mechanics“,
Lucia Reining and Francesco Sottile (LSI, Ecole polytechnique)

12 am. – 2 pm Lunch break

Session 3-Chair: Michèle Leduc (SFP)

2 pm-2:25The phosphoroscope of Edmond Becquerel: the reconstructed experience“,
Guilhem Gallot with the project group students (Ecole Polytechnique)

2:25 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.From phosphorescence to the ultimate efficiency of solar cells“,
Jean François Guillemoles (CNRS-IPVF)

Session 4-Chair: Gaëtan Masson (Inst. Becquerel, Brussels)

14.45-15.00 “30 years of the Edmond Becquerel Prize for photovoltaics“,
Joachim Luther (President of the Europen Becquerel Committee, ISE Fraunhofer)

3 pm-3:30pmStatus and perspective of todays main PV technology “,
Joachim Luther and Stephan Glunz (ISE Fraunhofer, Freiburg)

3.30-3.50pmThe photovoltaic industry in France“,
Xavier Daval (SER),  Richard Loyen (ENERPLAN)

3:50 p.m. – 4:10 p.m. Break

Session 5 – Chair: Marika Edoff (Uppsala Univ.)

4:10 p.m. – 4:50 p.m.From Dye Cells to Perovskite Solar Cells: New avenues for Photovoltaics”
                                    Michael Graetzel (EPFL, Lausanne)

Closing session Chair : Edmond Amouyal (LSI, Ecole polytechnique)

4:50 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.Antoine, Edmond, Henri, Jean, what lessons for the present time?”
                                   Jean Pierre Chevalier (CNAM), Nathanaelle Schneider (CNRS-IPVF), Leatitia Brottier (Dualsun), Daniel Suchet (Ecole Polytechnique-IPVF)

6 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Closing ceremony at Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle, 47 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris

Registrations & location

The symposium will take place in Paris. 

Registrations are free of charge.

To register, click here

Further readings

https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k2968p/f561.item.zoom

  • European Becquerel prize committee for Photovoltaics

https://www.becquerel-prize.org/about-the-becquerel-prize/

The rays associated to the most refrangible rays of sunlight, when reaching metal blades immersed in a liquid, are creating electrical effects that are specifically attributed to them, and that cannot be attributed to a calorific origin.

Edmond Becquerel, 1839 – “Report on the electrical effects produced on the influence of solar light”,  Mémoire sur les effets électriques produits sous l’influence des rayons solaires, Comptes rendus de l’académie des sciences 9(1839)561

The rays associated to the most refrangible rays of sunlight, when reaching metal blades immersed in a liquid, are creating electrical effects that are specifically attributed to them, and that cannot be attributed to a calorific origin.

Edmond Becquerel, 1839 – “Report on the electrical effects produced on the influence of solar light”, Comptes rendus de l’académie des sciences 9(1839)561

Webmaster : Gaby Creantor – gaby.creantor@ipvf.fr

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